Cleaning Prior Records

Expungments under Cal. Penal Code Section 1203.4

Proposition 47 Resentencing

Sealing of Records 

Expungements

California   Penal   Code   Section   1203.4   gives   defendants   a   second   chance   through   expungement   of   records.   An   invidiual previously   convicted,   or   who   has   pled   guilty   (or   no   contest),   can   petition   the   court   to   have   the   accusations   dismissed   and be released from “all penalties and disabilities” resulting from that offense. As   of   January   1   2018,   a   new   law   in   California   prohibits   employers   from   asking   about   a   criminal   history   until   a   conditional offer   of   employment   is   made.   Although   the   employer   cannot   deny   an   offer   of   employment   solely   because   of   a   conviction, that criminal history may be considered on an individiual basis and serve as a reason to revoke the offer of employment. An   Expungement   of   a   record   has   many   benefits.   For   example,   California   law   generally   prohibits   potential   employers   from asking   about   or   considerting   a   criminal   conviction   that   has   been   expunged.   Once   a   criminal   record   has   been   dismissed,   it generally   does   not   need   to   be   disclosed   even   when   a   conditional   offer   of   employment   is   made.   It   should   be   noted   that even   when   expunged,   some   stringent   background   checks   will   still   show   a   prior   conviction   even   if   it   has   been   expunged. Here are some of the benefits of an expungment: Potential   employers   are   now   prohibited   from   considering   prior   misdemeanor   and   felony   convictions   that   have   been dismissed by a judge even when a conditional offer of employment has been made. State   agencies   issuing   and   overseeing   professional   licensing   may   treat   an   applicant   more   favorably when   applying   for a new license or defending an existing professional license. A   judicial   dismissal   is   an   official   acknowledgement   that   a   person   has   been   rehabilitiated   from   the   offenses   expunged. In   some   cases,   a   person   may   also   be   eligible   for   a   Governor’s   Pardon,   which   allows   a   person’s   rights   to   own   or possess a firearm to be reinstated. Depending   on   the   type   of   background   check   done,   convictions   that   have   been   expunged   will   be   removed.   Most background   checks   done   for   residential   rental   applications,   credit   checks,   financial   aid   and   other   similar   applications will   include   these   types   of   background   checks.   Background   checks   requiring   more   stringent   reporting,   such   as fingerprinting,   will   still   include   a   prior   criminal   history   but   will   indicate   that   the   charges   were   expunged   and   cannot   be considered in offers of employment. Dismissal   of   a   prior   conviction   also   gives   you   a   new   personal   new   beginning.      Cleaning   your   record   helps   you   present yourself with   honesty   in   social   circles   and   professional   networks   and   make   a   statement with   confidence   that your   past is not who you are today.

Proposition 47 Resentencing

Proposition   47,   passed   by   California   voters   in   2014,   reduced   the   penalties   for   some   theft   and   drug   crimes   by   making   them misdemeanors   as   opposed   to   felonies   or   “wobblers”   (which   are   crimes   that   the   District   Attorney   may   charge   either   as   a felony   or   as   a   misdemeanor). A   person   must   meet   certain   requirements   before   he/she   can   qualify   for   a   resentencing   under Proposition   47.   However,   the   maximum   penalties   for   those   who   qualify   are   1)   six   months   to   one   year   in   jail;   and/or   2)   a   fine of   up   to   $1,000.   Receiving   a   resentencing   under   Proposition   47   may   mean   earlier   release,   immediate   release   and/or   a shorter time until eligibility for an expungement. What crimes may qualify for Proposition 47 resentencing? Theft crimes where the value of the stolen property or damages are $950 or less and include: o Grand Theft Auto o Grand Theft Firearm o Receiving Stolen Property o Check Fraud (forgery) o Shoplifting o Bad Check Writing (Cal. Pen. Code Section 476(a)) Drug crimes where mere possession of the following is against the law: o Controlled   substances,   which   include   narcotics,   illegal   drugs,   and   certain   prescription   drugs   (e.g.,   Vicodin,   Oxycontin, etc.) o Cannabis (marijuana) if not within allowable regulations under Section 11357 o Methamphetamines and other stimulants under Section 11377 If   you   believe   you   may   qualify   for   Proposition   47   resentencing,   or   you   are   just   not   sure   whether   you   do,   please   contact   our office    for    a    FREE    CONSULTATION .    Successfully    appealing   your    conviction    under    Proposition    47    requires    a    thorough understanding of the law, analysis of your facts and review of prior criminal history.

Sealing of Records

California   Penal   Code   Section   851.87   provides   individuals   who   have   successfully   completed   a   pre-filing   diversion   program to   have   their   record   of   arrest   sealed.   Upon   granting   of   the   petition   to   seal   records,   a   person   may   answer   “no”   to   a   question related   to   the   arrest   for   that   charge   (except with   respect   to   applications   to   be   a   peace   officer). Although   the   sealed   records remain    accessible    to    criminal    justice    agencies,    it    provides    an    individuals    an    opportunity    to    avoid    having    to    answer questions related to those arrests in the positive on job, school, financial aid, licensing  and other similar applications.
Case Results…  People v. J.K. (2017): Client had a prior conviction for possession of controlled substance for sale from nearly 20 years ago. Client has been successful in establishing a career, owning a business and having a family. Mr. Sabado was able to get a Certificate of Rehabilitation and Governor’s Pardon, thereby restoring all of his civil rights.   People v. J.C. (2013): Client had a conviction for felony assault with a deadly weapon. Client was an electrician journeyman and hoped to get a state contractor’s license. Mr. Sabado got the conviction dismissed pursuant to 1203.4 (expunged) so that Client could receive his license.
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CONTACT US EMAIL US TEL.: 909.626.2003 FAX: 909.626.5408

Cleaning Prior Records

Expungments under Cal. Penal Code

Section 1203.4

Proposition 47 Resentencing

Sealing of Records 

Expungements

California   Penal   Code   Section   1203.4   gives   defendants   a second    chance    through    expungement    of    records.    An invidiual   previously   convicted,   or who   has   pled   guilty   (or   no contest),   can   petition   the   court   to   have   the   accusations dismissed     and     be     released     from     “all     penalties     and disabilities” resulting from that offense. As    of    January    1    2018,    a    new    law    in    California    prohibits employers    from    asking    about    a    criminal    history    until    a conditional    offer    of    employment    is    made.    Although    the employer    cannot    deny    an    offer    of    employment    solely because    of    a    conviction,    that    criminal    history    may    be considered   on   an   individiual   basis   and   serve   as   a   reason   to revoke the offer of employment. An    Expungement    of    a    record    has    many    benefits.    For example,     California     law     generally     prohibits     potential employers   from   asking   about   or   considerting   a   criminal conviction   that   has   been   expunged.   Once   a   criminal   record has    been    dismissed,    it    generally    does    not    need    to    be disclosed   even   when   a   conditional   offer   of   employment   is made.   It   should   be   noted   that   even   when   expunged,   some stringent     background     checks     will     still     show     a     prior conviction   even   if   it   has   been   expunged.   Here   are   some   of the benefits of an expungment: Potential      employers      are      now      prohibited      from considering       prior       misdemeanor       and       felony convictions    that    have    been    dismissed    by    a    judge even   when    a    conditional    offer    of    employment    has been made. State   agencies   issuing   and   overseeing   professional licensing   may   treat   an   applicant   more   favorably when applying   for   a   new   license   or   defending   an   existing professional license. A   judicial   dismissal   is   an   official   acknowledgement that     a     person     has     been     rehabilitiated     from     the offenses    expunged.    In    some    cases,    a    person    may also   be   eligible   for   a   Governor’s   Pardon, which   allows a   person’s   rights   to   own   or   possess   a   firearm   to   be reinstated. Depending   on   the   type   of   background   check   done, convictions     that     have     been     expunged     will     be removed.      Most      background      checks      done      for residential   rental   applications,   credit   checks,   financial aid   and   other   similar   applications   will   include   these types    of    background    checks.    Background    checks requiring      more      stringent      reporting,      such      as fingerprinting,   will   still   include   a   prior   criminal   history but will   indicate   that   the   charges were   expunged   and cannot be considered in offers of employment. Dismissal   of   a   prior   conviction   also   gives   you   a   new personal   new   beginning.      Cleaning   your   record   helps you    present   yourself   with    honesty    in    social    circles and    professional    networks    and    make    a    statement with   confidence   that   your   past   is   not   who   you   are today.

Proposition 47 Resentencing

Proposition     47,     passed     by     California     voters     in     2014, reduced   the   penalties   for   some   theft   and   drug   crimes   by making    them    misdemeanors    as    opposed    to    felonies    or “wobblers”   (which   are   crimes   that   the   District Attorney   may charge   either   as   a   felony   or   as   a   misdemeanor).   A   person must     meet     certain     requirements     before     he/she     can qualify   for   a   resentencing   under   Proposition   47.   However, the   maximum   penalties   for   those   who   qualify   are   1)   six months   to   one   year   in   jail;   and/or   2)   a   fine   of   up   to   $1,000. Receiving   a   resentencing   under   Proposition   47   may   mean earlier   release,   immediate   release   and/or   a   shorter   time until eligibility for an expungement. What        crimes        may        qualify        for Proposition 47 resentencing? Theft   crimes   where   the   value   of   the   stolen   property or damages are $950 or less and include: o Grand Theft Auto o Grand Theft Firearm o Receiving Stolen Property o Check Fraud (forgery) o Shoplifting o Bad Check Writing (Cal. Pen. Code Section 476(a)) Drug   crimes   where   mere   possession   of   the   following is against the law: o Controlled    substances,    which    include    narcotics, illegal   drugs,   and   certain   prescription   drugs   (e.g., Vicodin, Oxycontin, etc.) o Cannabis     (marijuana)     if     not     within     allowable regulations under Section 11357 o Methamphetamines    and    other    stimulants    under Section 11377 If     you     believe     you     may     qualify     for     Proposition     47 resentencing,   or   you   are   just   not   sure   whether   you   do, please    contact    our    office    for    a    FREE    CONSULTATION . Successfully   appealing   your   conviction   under   Proposition 47   requires   a   thorough   understanding   of   the   law,   analysis of your facts and review of prior criminal history.

Sealing of Records

California   Penal   Code   Section   851.87   provides   individuals who   have   successfully   completed   a   pre-filing   diversion program    to    have    their    record    of    arrest    sealed.    Upon granting    of    the    petition    to    seal    records,    a    person    may answer   “no”   to   a   question   related   to   the   arrest   for   that charge   (except   with   respect   to   applications   to   be   a   peace officer).   Although   the   sealed   records   remain   accessible   to criminal    justice    agencies,    it    provides    an    individuals    an opportunity   to   avoid   having   to   answer   questions   related   to those   arrests   in   the   positive   on   job,   school,   financial   aid, licensing  and other similar applications.

Contact Us

909.626.2003 678 S. Indian Hill Blvd., Ste. 210, Claremont, CA 91711 1109 W. San Bernardino Rd., Ste. 250, Covina, CA 91722 30 N. Raymond Ave., Ste. 705, Pasadena, CA 91107 Assistant@sabadolaw.com http://www.sabadolaw.com